Waste Warrior Live

Coming from the third world, I have a different perspective with trash.
When I was growing up in Hong Kong our family was poor, my parents could not afford to buy toys to my brother and sisters. Nevertheless but with little imagination I paint and made things from trash to amused myself.
A few years ago, we had a long garbage strike here in Toronto. The streets were full with trash which gave me the idea to resume my childhood hobby: making things from trash.
I started to picking up common paper product as my art material, coffee cups, shoe-boxes and shopping bags and turned them into art.

Here are some examples:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/alfredng/sets/72157622837786929/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/alfredng/sets/72157622837786929/

Enjoy!

Alfred Ng







 I have heard the show What a Waste a couple of times this summer while traveling in my car. Being a waste junky  I really enjoy it.
I would like to suggest a topic for a future show. How biomedical waste in Canada is handled. Specifically how some companies such as Daniels is trying to promote safer and reusable containers for biomedical waste. For example is some regions of Canada hospitals use reusable sharps containers. the sharps waste after processing can be reused. Contrast this to areas such as Alberta where most of the biomedical waste is incinerated that has seen better days. Just talking about the advancements in treatment technology would be a great topic.
Ian Jennings



I heard the blurb for the show on zero waste. I know weeks or even months of research have already gone into the making of the episode, but I would be so grateful if you could examine, even briefly, the "whole story" of zero waste in a follow-up sometime.

Inspired by a colleague who has gone zero waste, I looked into trying it myself. I'm pretty keen on cutting down on waste where I can (I'm an avid proponent of the "diva cup", flushing rarely, and so on) so it seemed natural to see what else I could do to reduce the amount of garbage AND recycling that our house produced. While on this educational quest, I realized that there was only one store in our area that sold milk in glass bottles -- a health food store that uses a lot of packaging on virtually everything else (even fresh fruit & veg), so that buying this milk would require a special trip by car. I also noticed that the glass bottles of milk have a disposable plastic lid, and I wondered how much less plastic was in that lid than the bags in which we currently buy our milk. Is the waste of making 1-2 extra car trips each week and the plastic lids really better than plastic milk bags? Are there other hidden wastes in zero waste lifestyles?

I am sad to say that I no longer strive for zero waste, discouraged by the inability to do it easily and (selfishly) a love of crackers. We still do our best, but like most Canadians, it is probably not enough. I'm not seeking absolution (however nice that would be!), but I am curious to know if there are other situations where the reusable option is comparable to the disposable option, whether due to increased driving or other "hidden" components that we fail to consider.

Thanks.
 Erica Moodie



 Love your show. I sometimes wish it were longer and more in depth. But this is an excellent beginning and a great way to showcase positive change. I really liked your program about e-waste since I have a broken iPod and can't afford to get a new one Ifixit sounds like an excellent site.
Keep up the good work:)
Sara Kelly



Great show!  Off the top of my head, a few suggestions for the re-use of these hand rails.  As protectors for the top edge of pick-up truck beds.  Protect the pain, reduce denting and make sliding in materials such as board easier.  As chair rails in high traffick areas. Like airports, bus depots, restaraunts etd,  As corner protectors in places like grocery stores to fend of shopping crts or homes with children and their trikes and riding toys.  Alipped int fire hose for bumpers,  The rails are tough, resilient and won't rot.  As covers for hand rails, especially in cold climates,  Steel is burtal and can get very rough and aggravet arthritis.  As covers for falt aluminum door pulls and handles in commercial doors.  May be dated, but caps for waterbed frames on the upper edge.  Chair handle covers for metal chairs.  Automobile bumper insers as current bumper techmology is very flimsy and prone to damage. Schped to fit a car carrier for kayaks and small boats,  Protectors for boats when out of the water or in drydock.Pieces stacked and spaced to make knife blocks,  Sliced lenghtwise to make tough baseboards in places like hospitals, factories.  So these are my initial thoughts, I am sure there are lots more out there.  I love making use of discarded materials,  I have spent years making theatre props out of junk.  It is always a fun challenge to make interesting and unusual items out of discarded (cheap) materials.  Keep up the great work.
Vern: Yoshida





Why haven't governments around the world DEMANDED the world's shipping industry (from fishers to cruise ships) hire the fishers of the oceans to drag net the new age Sargossa Sea and clean it up and recycle it in their "supplier" countries. We all know where stuff comes from and it seems the greatest producers are the least responsible.
Any reason for this??? not happening???? We all eat what comes from the sea and it's getting so that we can't eat it. Hard to believe???? I think not. Environmentalists are usually "friendly" eaters so if their food supply is threatened why aren't they reacting to this big problem???
Just a thought or two.
Thanks, Florence Roberts


 Cooling your house while trapping hot air in the attic
Power venting your attic will: make your roof last longer, make your house more comfortable, reduce cost of air conditioning.

-John HANSON

Hi Torah, enjoy enormously your most informative program.

In your capacity as both professor and broadcaster, I wonder if you could also dedicate a session on methods of waste water treatment using aerobic and anaerobic bacteria micro_organisms.

If that is not possible, could you please direct me to industrially_proven, focused techniques in the literature for the above processes?

Have also searched online but without much success. Thank you in advance.
Peter Kalogiannides









I have spent some time in private homes in the USA and they were all equipped with machines that chop up food waste while the water is running to keep the machine cool and wash away the food waste.  On the face of it, this seems very wasteful of both water and electricity but a comparison would have to be made with the impact of other waste disposal methods.  Have you looked into this?
Re Beef using up water, eating beef is also helpful to people with iron deficiency, although most people just eat it because they like it.  Are the there other ways to get iron that are as easy on the digestion?
Rosalyn Frankyl

Regarding your program about water, I think most people think that water goes back into the water cycle, so it eventually returns as fresh water. Is that not true? In places where surface or ground water is not plentiful, it's easier to understand that water needs to be conserved. But in the big picture, water doesn't permanently get used (like oil), so if freshwater levels in Canada are generally okay, excess water usage (that is, water that isn't actually required) won't be perceived as an actual waste.
All to say that I think a better education of the public is needed. It's not enough to say we're wasting water, when it doesn't seem that way, cognitively, to most people.
My concern with the bovine gas argument is that I have a sense that it may be for naught, seeing as though there is a failure to add into the equation, the decomposing of the grasses in the field if not eaten by the cow, I find this to be very important in the thinking of GHG and GW.

peter jort
 Your tagline above caught my ear because our company uses the same one. We innovate in the solid waste and wastewater areas. Have a look at our website www.terragon.net - it is pretty self-explanatory.

Regards,

Ron Denom


 Love your show. I reuse empty plastic bottles, 500ml and 2l for packaging turbochargers at my business. They cushion a bit and are very strong.
-H  Rohowsky




 I am not impressed with you coming to this conclusion of 'don't eat beef'.  I don't appreciate how easily you can make this statement on the radio.    Many people may be influenced because they may like you or may think your information is all true just because you're on the radio.

I make my  living ranching and raising cattle.  I am a third generation rancher and am proud of it.   We raise a nutritionally safe product.  You are not just trying to hurt big corporations by saying that, you are hurting producers like myself and their families that make their living in this industry!
-Terry Ostrander



 thank you for your good work.
question regarding two possible scenarios,

take a field of grass, enough to feed my cow through a winter,
1) cut the grass, make hay, feed the cow, spread the manure.
2) simply allow the grass die and rot into the ground.

we now know exactly how much gas is produced by feeding the grass to the cow,
we know how much carbon is stored in the milk meat etc. and how much gas I will produce eating there of,
we know that when the grass rots back into the field it gives off gasses and carbon gets stored into the top soil.

we start with the same amount of grass in both scenarios,

Q. which puts more GHG into the atmosphere?

the same question could be asked about a tree falling in the forest,
either we use it for fire wood, or let it rot, either way gas is produced.

obviously the time scale is different,
burning wood sends off gas immediately, as does the cow,
the rotting process is longer.

I see this as an important question that wants to be added to the equation, there may be a needless condemnation of bovine taking place here, some farm land is not good for carrots etc. I feel quite assured that the bovine family has a place on marginal land, but I would like, if necessary, to be proven wrong, but with good reason full slate of facts.

thank you for your consideration,
peter jort


Sewage sludge contains all the pharmaceuticals and personal care products that are  flushed down the drain, in addition to industrial wastewater.  Yet sewage sludge/biosolids is touted as a source of nutrients and spread onto farmland. Only 7 metals and some pathogens are tested for before land-spreading .  You might want to explore this topic on "What a Waste" . For example a recent science article noted that triclosan is present in sludge in large amounts and can be taken up into food crops. This is just one of hundreds of chemicals of concern that can have additive or synergistic actions in human systems at low level exposures. A science article by Jennifer Mathney noted that it would be impossible to do safety tests for all the combinations of chemicals in sewage sludge.  In Europe the safest method is considered to be high temperature incineration with the best air pollution controls.
- Barbara McElgunn





















 I am patiently waiting for the episode discussing municipal waste and its conversion to electricity as is being done by Plasco Energy in Ottawa.
- Ed DeMattia









 I suggest that you have a l@@k at a project that the City of Edmonton is developing jointly with Enerkem.
Basically they disrupt the molecules in Sorted Municipal Waste and reconfigure them into Propane/Propanol/Butane/Butanol etc

The project schedule appears to have slipped but is still in progress AFAIK.

-john hall 
Hi Torah,

I enjoy your show and it certainly gets you thinking.

One thing I do is make quilts. I know that quilts have been around since the mammoth hide. Today's quilts tend to me made with new fabrics. I make mine from clothing of the deceased. People bring in the deceased clothing and I design, cut, sew and finish a quilt to either represent the person who has died or the memories that person invokes in others.

With the popularity of resale shops you would think that clothing was a good recycling candidate - that our discards generate funds for community efforts but I understand that much of what does not sell goes overseas. I wonder about the implications of that. Also, fabrics used today in clothing seems either less destructive (remember fortel) and more destructive (cottons and how pollution has made it more vulnerable.

I see a story here on the true implications of clothing -  does it fill our landfills, are we really recycling it smartly ?

In my experiences with memory quilts, I've used everything. Clothing makes long lasting, innovative quilts.

Just a thought, albeit a bit random

Rita Barrette
Hello,

I heard the show for the first time last night and loved it! I work for the Metro Toronto Convention Center as the Sustainability Officer here and a big part of what I do is recycling/waste management. It's so great to hear about the waste industry on national radio. I hope you're getting a good response from listeners.

You mentioned you were looking for waste worrier nominations - if you are doing an episode related to the hospitality industry I'm going to be bold and nominate the MTCC. We divert almost 90% of the waste from events held here, including digesting/composting almost 450MT of food waste annually. Depending on the year, we manage any where from 1200 - 2000 MT of material, and work very hard to divert the vast majority of it. Donations and repurposing are a huge part of what I do here too - there's so much good stuff left over from events that can be used again!


Thanks,
Vivian Fleet




Gayle walford from the Annapolis Valley in Nova Scotia is diverting bedding sheets from hospitals enroute to the landfill and dyeing them and selling them as fabric for sewers and quilters , weaving them into rugs  and  a growing list of other products.
-Peter Matthews

 I began working with waste in 1990, the year after the Haggersville tire fire in southern Ontario.
Tires were the beginning but now we make material matter in our business of diversion and transformation. For a look at our work and philosophy please review our website www.bon-eco.com
Thanks.
Carolyn
At IWT we are a PEI based company that has recently developed the worlds first, solar powered, packaged waste water treatment system.

Our core IP was developed in partnership with Carleton University (Canada) and the University of Illinois (U.S.A) and we plan to validate the performance of our technology with Dalhousie University (Canada).

150 billion gallons of untreated wastewater is discharged in Canada every year. Current technology does not solve these problems for remote Canadian population clusters. We have designed the product to solve this problem by designing a self-contained, self powered treatment system. Federal regulations will require that by 2020 all communities must comply with stricter standards - we understand our product can help communities reach these goals.

We also see huge potential for our product in disaster relief / humanitarian operations - basically anywhere that electricity is scarce and people need treated wastewater in a hurry.

For more information please see www.islandwatertech.com

We have a great team and are very excited with the coming few months as we commercialize our technology.

Feel free to reach out with any questions - it would be great to get a chance to further explain our technology and future plans for commercialization.

Regards,
Patrick
Hello, you asked listeners to write in about waste warriors that they know. I know some seniors who may qualify as waste warriors. They purchase very few packaged foods and eat only home cooked foods. They compost using the green bin and recycle using blue bins. They leave almost no actual garbage at the curb. They compost in their back yard. They grow a vegetable garden with a variety of herbs, vegetables and berries. They also love flowers and grow beautiful perennials and flowers from seeds. They start their veggie plants from seeds indoors  in early spring and plant them outside as soon as possible. They only purchase things they really need, so only things they can't make themselves. They are very creative and make a lot of things others would simply purchase in the store. They freeze fruits and vegetables in the summer to use all year. They make their own jam. The woman sews, crochets and knits, bakes, cooks. The man is very handy and fixes and builds things. They have marked their mailbox "no flyers" so that they don't have excess paper waste. They reuse scrap paper from envelopes or junk mail for notes, so don't buy note pads. They only drive when necessary and have a fuel efficient vehicle. They save any containers, plastic bags, etc. and use for other purposes. They really do follow, "reduce, reuse, recycle".   Let me know if you'd like to contact them for your show.
-Elisabeth Jastrau
 Thank you so much for this. I just had time to listen. I firmly believe that nuclear is the way to go. Although we need ways to store the waste more effort needs to be made in reuse technologies.

Marilyn Parsons

Dear Dr. Kachur:

I am enjoying your radio program "What a Waste".  It has provided a lot of great information, options, and general knowledge.

I wanted to comment regarding the most recent show, which discussed use of a number of organic materials in creation of car parts, such as use of tomato skins and soy.

I live in a rural area and our cars are stored in an open car port.  Up until our last two cars, we has cars from the 1980s or earlier, and had no issues with storing the cars in the carport.  The engine heat did (and does) attract small (and larger) rodents into the engine compartment when we parked it overnight. However, the mice, etc would vacate by morning, since the car engine cooled down during the night, and no damage appeared to be done.  Then we purchased two cars, the first was a late 1990's, the second early 2000's.  Literally days after we got the first one, I noticed a bunch of chewed up foam under the car, and discovered in was pipe insulation foam from the engine compartment which covered metal tubes.  I did some research and discovered this foam was soy based.  The animals left the other similar foam made of other materials alone.  The same thing happened when that car was replaced with the early 2000 model, and same type (soy based) foam again.

We have often owned cars and other products which are decades old.  My experience is that certain materials degrade long before most of the others, sometimes ruining the product completely and often these are organic or plant based plastics or foams.  After all, plants are designed to decompose quickly in the environment, and they do the same thing when they are made into parts for machines, tires, etc.  On the other hand, I have owned 30 year old cars which have held up to wear and tear or oil and grease contact, etc, without a problem.  It is all well and good to make products with "compostible" parts if they are to be used for a short time and discarded, but for products which require durability, like cars, it may be a less wise choice of materials.

Along the same lines, here is another issue. In order to remove lead from electronics, most solders used to attach electronic components have been reformulated to contain no lead.  The internet is full of stories of very early failure of electronic goods made over the last decade or less.  These goods used the newer high tin solders and new technologies to attach components to circuit boards.  The problem is the new solders do not adhere as well to the parts, and it can fracture or develop "legs" of the solder components from the stress of heating and cooling cycles when the products are turned on and off.  This causes the solder joints to fail or become shorted, and this problem is reaching epidemic proportions. I have a Sony computer monitor which had failures within hours of use.  Sony dutifully replaced this model with the exact same monitors with the same problems, but once the one year warranty ran out, that was the end of the replacement program.  From the number of complaints I have seen on line, I assume many thousands of these large computer monitors have or will end up in landfills or recycling plants after just hours of use.  Sony never admitted to the problem, and now that they are all sold and the warranty over, the company has washed their hands of the problem.  It was a manufacturing related defect, and it appears  to never have been corrected on the product. This is a common problem with newer electronics products due to both the new solders in use, and the manufacturing methods, and it explains, in part, why so many of these products now come with 90 days to one year warranties now, even top end large screen TVs.  The monitor I mentioned above was a high resolution 24” 3d model which originally sold for $600.

Sometimes it's one step forward, two steps back.

Art Entlich


 Hi I was just at the Campbell River dump and there was a roofing company getting rid of a whole dump trailer load of left over roof shingles. I asked the attendant if I could load up my truck.  He told my that it was against the law.
I thought this was crazy.  I could of roofed a whole shed. In a day and age where the mantra is to reduce and recycle it seems laws like this should be abolished. I would have been happy to take almost all that he was throwing out,which would have saved close to a ton of what is now in the land fill.
--Noah Stewart-Webb



Burning food for heat--why not compost instead? How about collecting floating plastics from the Pacific gyres to make the Bill Gates' toilets?
My major point is that several of your programs' topics seem small and unconnected and frankly not adequate to meet climate change and peak oil constraints. I hope that you can Google Transition Towns to see that there is a movement with over 1000 world-wide chapters which seek to  live sustainably and cheaply, especially with regard to to local food and solar energy  productions.
Rob Hopkins in Totnes UK is the big push behind TT.
Also see the "Degrowth" movement in the south of France.
Cheers.
--Nick Guthrie



I have also worked with composting toilets; 2 toilet blocks at Maquinna Provincial Park in Hotsprings Cove, BC. They are solar and wind-powered self-contained units where (ideally) no waste needs to be removed and instead it is broken down into soil in the chamber below. The problem is that the pile of waste must be raked and innappropriate items removed... it is depressing to see what people will throw down a toilet but one of the worst items are the small plastic tampon applicator cylinders that women discard. Each has to plucked out by hand.
These toilets are also waterless, which leads to my second point.
My home is just a small RV in the woods and so I am able to urinate outside in the yard in most cases and not waste drinking quality water flushing it.  But I developed a habit while in Thailand, where western toilets are not to be found. Now I no longer use paper to clean myself after defecating, I use a J-cloth and wash myself with the wet cloth and then wash out the cloth. I actually feel cleaner than ever and rather disdain having to use paper when in a public toilet.
Its true I use a slight bit more water for washing, but my RV toilet is very low flow compared even to conventional low-flow.
I find using paper not only less sanitary but wasteful of forest resources and bleaching chemicals and processes, fuel required for transportation of the product, etc.
If paper must be used could it not be made specifically from materials and treated with bacteria that are actually beneficial to the end processes?
--Mathew Phillips





Given how wasteful our culture is, I was delighted to come across your program [as well as  somewhat surprised that no one has thought of it before]. Something you might be familiar with, but might want to check out some more, an award-winning Rick Mercer Report segment on Edmonton's recycling facility. I remember when I saw it being very impressed by how comprehensive the place was.
--Ray Jones



I really like your very original show.  I found the episode on human waste very interesting just as we have to deal with a minor problem with our septic system that several companies offer services to perform but need to pay big $$ to get it fix because the ministry of the environment in Quebec will not make a repair to our septic tank (broken baffle), because repairs are not covered in the rules and as a result we have to change it creating about 5 tons of toxic debris! and the cost is in the thousands.  They claim the repair would void the certification for the tank.  All this to say that the rules are so arcane and proscriptive that implementing the solutions you discuss would be next to impossible to implement legally by people and if it is not mentioned explicitly in the rulebook, it can't be done!

One issue you did not discuss is how we deal with medication in urine, the processes you mention are not removing them before spreading in the fields.  If untreated are the medications and hormonest staying in the soil or attach to the plants?  What would be the environmental impact of this? I saw a good publication on-line with an issue on No-Mix issues.  http://www.eawag.ch/medien/publ/eanews/archiv/news_63/index_EN

If you have not done so, maybe you should address recycling and re-using construction waste from roofing shingles to wood to concrete, asphalt, drywall.  A lot of good material could be diverted from landfill and recycled into useful products.

Looking forward to listening to the rest of the series.

Cheers,

Luc Fournier






Caught the show on Friday morning, yay for using waste!  We live in an earthship...862 reused tires, 10,000 pop cans, 1400 bottles, recovered wood galore, sheeps wool in our natural plaster, future plans include humanure toilets... check out our FB page, The Darfield Earthship and our website, www.darfieldearthship.com  Have you heard of Grant Baldwin and Jenny Rustemeyer? They just released their second documentary...Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story.  Inspiring!  This was the first time I listened to your show, I'll be sure to tune in again!

-Sandra Burkholder 




Absolutely fascinating and deserves more exposure in the media somehow.....
One thing not touched on was - a healthy adult excretes ideal waste?  
What of the enormous amour of medications / antibiotics / anti-depressants / used by the population? People in bad health shouldn't or couldn't participate? 
Would this not taint the potential of the recycled products? 
 I realize wheat wouldn't be but further up the food chain... ?
Perhaps there are no harmful contaminants after processibng the waste ?

Really really great episode

-T Konigsthal



 Love the show. If you are still looking for waste warriors you should check out Gordie Wornoff. He runs a business called a higher plane. Here is his site.. http://www.ahigherplane.ca/  Not only does he do great work but he is an amazing guy. I met him in Univeristy doing social justice activism, and he is definitely an inspiration. Check out the "salvage man documentary" on his site done by some humber students. He has also got tons of laughs for his part in the discovery channel show called Junk raiders.

Anyway, just an idea.

Allan.


I have 3 suggestions to make to avoid waste.
(I) Use of bidets to clean with water. It takes less than 1 litre of water, 3 pieces (sheets of paper) to dry and your are done.

Benefits: Savings in the amount of toilet paper, need to cut fewer trees. Hygienically, it is much clear. Bidet Cost :$ 50-75.

(ii) If we were to develop and install a mechanism on the water coming into the house, which will require the users to pump water water instead of turning the tap on.

This will eliminate water wastage at the tap, particularly during taking showers etc. in additions to adding physical activity many times a day in pumping the water.

(iii) very common, not new but can be re-visited. Drying clothes in the back yard. It can be done  during the months of May-October and will save tons of electricity during summer months in addition to savings to the home owners

Thank you for the opportunity to join in.

-Adjit Liddar










I listen to your program in general with interest but specifically I was interested in what you had to say about E-Waste as it is something I deal with at least weekly if not daily.  I have been working in the computer and technology field since the early 80's. Currently I'm a self employed computer consultant.

While your story was very good you actually missed a large portion of the problem.  What follows will be the sort of thing that drive Kevin O'Leary crazy. As a general statement a huge portion of the source of the e-waste problem is the way companies' performance is measured. A public company is all too often assessed by sales, profits and perhaps to a lesser extent market share.  What on earth does this have to do with E-Waste?  Let me explain via some examples.

Apple Computer: Apple for some time has wanted to position themselves as the conduit by which all software and apps are installed on their devices.  This means 3rd party software developers need to go through either iTunes or the AppStore to get software installed on their devices. If that was the only constraint that would be acceptable.  HOWEVER Apple has also designed things to kill the market for older used equipment.  It turns out that older versions of software are no longer available to you unless you purchased them from the App Store at the time they were the current version.  So for example you could have the "Pintrest" app for your iPhone 4 and use it without issue.  You decide to upgrade to an iPhone 5 and want to sell your iPhone 4. As any conscientious person would you reset the iPhone 4 back to factory defaults Low and behold the new owner, logging into the App Store with their account (having never bought the Pintrest application previously) is only offered the latest version of the application which, you guessed it, only runs on the newer IOS that comes in the newer iPads and iPhones. This practice all by itself kills the market for used iPhones when people discover they can't get the programs they want to have on their older device. When a working device is useless to them it might be sold for parts but more likely it will be just pitched into E-Waste. Getting back to my assertion if Apple wasn't being measured by sales and profits they wouldn't structure things to create an unnecessary glut of used (and useless) equipment.

CISCO: Cisco Systems is one of the largest players in networking technologies.  They have a support subscription structure whereby if an out of warranty device no longer has a current support subscription (which costs money of course) then you have no avenue to upgrading the firmware on the device even though this is a task performed by a technician in the field. To get an upgrade you need to log into their website, put in the model and serial number of the device and once its validated you can get the latest updates for the equipment.  If you don't have a valid support agreement then you can either purchase one or leave the site.  Even though the firmware is written, the user is doing all the work themselves to download and install it CISCO's practice creates a large amount of E-Waste as people discard perfectly working equipment which does not make economic sense to purchase a support contract for when the replacement cost with better equipment is cheaper. Often these updates contain bug fixes or plug security holes so a user would prefer to have them in the equipment than run it without it. Again a structure that wants to push either new sales or profits actually causes a huge amount of E-Waste

- jack 

In 2001, the UN estimated that 40% of the drinking water in the world is squandered to flush toilets (the estimate for ON is 28%).  To us, this is like burning Louis XIV furniture in your woodstove, so since '01 we have recycled all the greywater from our washing machine and bathtub/shower for flushing.

The system has proved to be simple, inexpensive and problem-free.  The 'drain water' system is separate from the potable water plumbing.  The plumbing just replaces the normal setup; it's not extra.  The drains go to a holding tank, then pumped (in our case by a large aquarium pump) to the toilet tank only at the time of the flush.  The only toilet mod required was some tweaking of the ballcock to increase the flowrate about 800% to accommodate the change to the low pressure/high flow situation.

The problem is that we've never found any 'green' organization to be the least bit interested.

We also have discovered a very simple way of extending the period between pumping of our septic system by over 400%.

Glen Pearce  Cloyne ON






Hello I am a warrior of a different kind . My long road to totally re-engineering a tool millions use that is out of date called a log splitter. In many ways it is so eco unfriendly . I have engineered a wedge less splitting system and much more tools for our forestry .  I am now patenting my new splitting system for the 21 century. 
Kind regards Inventor of Debert Nova Scotia .

You may wish to check out my company - Terrestrial Energy Inc., as we are moving ahead to start producing molten salt reactors which will be able to consume spent fuel from conventional reactors (plus low-enriched uranium and possibly thorium).  We are a Canadian company with an international network of employees and consultants.  Please see our website (www.terrestrialenergyinc.com) for the whole story

-Paul McIntosh



















































 I only first heard the words"ZERO WASTE Lifestyle" a few months back but I guess I have been living that way for years. Beginning as an informal household experiment in 2008 we have now reduced our waste out put to the point where we haven't put out any garbage to the curb since Aug 2011. We also just completed a ZERO WASTE Roof Project replacing our asphalt builder shingles with steel shingles that will last forever and sending less than 1 bag of garbage to landfill for the entire Project. This is one of a number of "ZERO WASTE renovations" including a shower (reduced our water/energy consumption by 80%) and basement (used wood from a 100 year old local barn). More on our roof Project at http://goo.gl/V8inLR and on us in general at http://goo.gl/gq894E http://goo.gl/gWRfd and www.baleengroup.com  Would be happy to share what we have learned that living ZERO WASTE is possible, it saves tons of $$ and (inside secret) it is EASY!!! Look forward to hearing from you - love the show!
   The nuclear waste issue is a pretty big one for 27 minutes, particularly as one of your guests pointed out, because the general public knows little or nothing about it, (which may very well be just the way the nuclear industry would like it to be).   You may have tried to present a balanced picture of the issue, but I believe you ended up with a bunch of very interesting guests most of whom appear to be believers in the ultimate good of nuclear power.
I was also quite surprised that you didn't include Gordon Edwards, longtime spokesperson for the respected Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, and an internationally recognized authority on the safety of nuclear power.  If you ever do a Nuclear Waste, Part 2 program, Edwards would certainly help you achieve a more balanced perspective.
--Karl Raab
You ended your show on nuclear waste by implying that we have to choose between two evils: nuclear waste and carbon pollution.  This is not true.  According to many analysts we are on the brink of a revolution in clean and, crucially for our so called democracy, decentralized energy production and distribution, led by solar. Here is a link to an op-ed that appeared in The Guardian today:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/07/solar-has-won-even-if-coal-were-free-to-burn-power-stations-couldnt-compete

Here's Al Gore in the Rolling Stone:

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-turning-point-new-hope-for-the-climate-20140618

Tony Seba is also very persuasive on this:

http://tonyseba.com

I hope the CBC will get around to covering this fascinating development soon.

Thanks.  I'm enjoying the show by the way.
--Patrick Gregory
Torah!
Please pardon my informality, but I've got to share this with you. Oh heck, you probably know about this already, anyway:  what do you know about uh, what is it called..."Mealime"?
It's an online, subscription recipe - and GROCERY SHOPPING! - service. Yeah, so what? Those services are out there online. But this one is a meal planning service for ONE! Yes, all those recipes that make meals for 4 are just fine...unless you live alone. I have no experience with it, because I don't live alone. But we don't waste food either. I'm just horrified when I hear about food waste! If we do waste food, I am completely unaware of it. So there you go.
-- Katannya Dirkson, Vancouver







I've been in the 'waste diversion' business for over 20 years and recently worked on a textiles recycling project with existing collectors, brokers and resellers/raggers/recyclers.  We are buying twice as many textiles as we did 20 years ago and only diverting just around 20% of our textiles.  It is estimated millions of dollars of textiles are being landfilled in Nova Scotia alone!!!  Textiles are now the number 4 item in our landfills in the province.

As an fyi, Nova Scotia has the lowest disposal rate in Canada by far (based on Statistics Canada numbers).

Cheers,

Bob Kenne










As I always cook more than 2 of us can eat I invite people over for dinner.
 Many last minute, spontaneous dinner parties that are always fun.  Just need to have friends who don't plan their meals ahead of time and don't care if your place is messy. :-)
--Kathy Reducka

Emma Halenko,  a university of Waterloo student's award winning business idea in its early growth.  Breathtaking jewelry pieces. And get this,  she goes searching through bins and garbage for raw materials.  Well worth a look,  and possibly including in a segment on waste in fashion.
--Mario Pistone
How about this for "storage": take the glass (has to be glass) and shove it into a subduction zone. By the time its recycled in the earth's mantle it be harmless. Feasable? No idea, maybe your guests would know
--F Hinz


What an interesting show you have going.
As a water/waste water operator I attended  seminar a few years ago on the subject of the biofouling of wells, which is a prevalent problem in both the oil and water industries. The speaker told he was brought in as an adviser regarding the corrosion of the Titanic which turned out to be the affect of biological activity not the salty sea water. The presenter went on to illustrate many different strains of bacteria how effective they can be breaking down materials. The American Nuclear Authority called in this expert regarding the possible corrosion of the containers to be filled with nuclear waste and buried deep in very stable rock formations. The advisor told them the effective life of the containers would fall very short of the design life expectancy because of bacterial activity.

The American experts claimed that scenario was impossible as bacteria could not exist in such high radioactivity, off they went to Three mile Island abandoned nuclear power plant were the nuclear material had been submerged deep under water for a number of years , submersible cameras revealed strange looking growths some resembling stalagmites and they turned out to be huge colonies of bacteria completely at home in one of the most radioactive environments on earth. This is why, as mentioned on your program, for all kinds of reasons,  it would be better to reuse the spent material rather than just storing it. I cannot remember the name of the speaker at that seminar, but he has become a major corrosion expert and at the time was from the Saskatoon University.
I thought I would send you this item as a side note to that very interesting nuclear waste  program.
                    Thanks for the show, Regards, Barry Boyle
Dear Staff of 'What a Waste':
I listened last night with great interest to your show 'What a Waste' and want to inform you of the organization I volunteer with, Repair Cafe Toronto.

We are a community of Torontonians committed to helping anyone who walks through our doors with repairing, or attempting to repair, items they carry in--for free. The public are shown how to repair each item, so that they can learn the needed skill set for future repairs. 
Everyone is warmly welcomed and personally taken through the process from entering our doors, to signing up and being shown where to wait. While waiting, our participants are also shown where they can access healthy (also free) snacks.
The typical after-repair response is:
'They fixed my item. I am thrilled!'; or 
'Wow! More people should know about this!' or 
'OK. What's the catch?' (As there is no catch, the answer to this is really 'Pay it forward'); or 'This is absolutely amazing. Even though they were not able to fix my item, the advice they gave me was extremely helpful'.

"We believe that recycling is not the solution. 
When an object is not working, repairing it can bring it back to life."  

 
You can learn more about us at: 

www.repaircafetoronto.ca  
www.facebook.com/repaircafetoronto and 
on our 90 second video:

 I love your program keep it up.
--Marisol Sanabria
 Hi, I was just listening to your program and was thinking that we do reduce food waste with our mobile juicing unit. We take imperfect fruit and vegetables and turn them into juice. Right on the farm where the food is grown. We can juice anything from apples, to cherries, berries and even vegetables.
Might be something for your program.
--Remo Trovato
Hi there,
I am an interior designer in Toronto who has taken on the task of collecting and redistributing a LARGE portion of the virgin waste in my industry. I collect, sort and send hundreds and thousands of pounds of designer goods to the arts, education and non-profit communities.
As well, i have created a line of couture soft home goods from small amounts of the waste i collect with the goal of raising awareness of the monstrous amount of waste that is created in the field every season.
I usually refer to myself as the Robin Hood of fabric, but I really like Waste Warrior!
Here is link to my spring pillow collection: http://joom.ag/7YoX
Here is a link to my first art show:  http://joom.ag/MYQb
Zero virgin materials were used in my installation for the art project. Most items were taken off the street or out of construction waste bins.
--Eve Weinberg
I thoroughly enjoyed your program on CBC Radio One, Vancouver, today, Fri., 27 June, and hope it isn't just a summer fill-in. I will continue to listen, and hope that you will deal with the wastefulness of our 'disposable society', e.g. Swiffer mop-pads - use it once and chuck it instead of putting it in the wash; Kleenex wet-wipes - same scenario - instead of water and a washable towel; bottled water instead of a washable water bottle. I wish I could think of more examples, but I'm sure you get my gist.
--Su Everts
Just heard your program today so thought I'd check to see where the drop off is locally. The HHW in Peterborough accepts a lot of ewaste, but not smoke detectors. So what do you do with those? I have 2.
--Paulette DeLaBarre

CEMENT BOARD COMPOSTER Pictures on website  https://sites.google.com/site/indigenecommunity/design/5-cement-board-composters
Its three years since the Sustainable Development Association has created a prototype cement board composter.
 I am the director of a help center for pregnant women in Drummondville.  Over the past 25 years, I have had to discard over 150 car seats because they have passed the expirey date. The large majority of these seats are in very good condition and only about 30% have a triangle embossed on the plastic.  I feel terrible about putting these large items in the garbage.  So I take the time (my personal time, about 30 to 45 minutes per car seat) to separate the metal and the cloth from the plastic and to recycle as much as possible of the seat.  But it is VERY LABORIOUS!.  Some American cities and also Vancouver provide a program to recycle these items.  The car seats only last about 6 years and then the date is expired.  If 30% of the seats are made with recyclable pastic, then surely public pressure could encourage the other 70% of manufacturers to use recyclabe plastic also.  The consumer could be encouraged to only buy car seats with recyclabe pastic.  Your radio program could inform consumers on this issue.  Thank you!
--Joanne de Verteuil
Hi, I'm the designer of Shot Lister, a film shot list and scheduling app that does away with the mounds of coloured paper used on film sets - and I mean mounds! It's really changing the way filmmakers prep & film.
 I only first heard the words"ZERO WASTE Lifestyle" a few months back but I guess I have been living that way for years. Beginning as an informal household experiment in 2008 we have now reduced our waste out put to the point where we haven't put out any garbage to the curb since Aug 2011. We also just completed a ZERO WASTE Roof Project replacing our asphalt builder shingles with steel shingles that will last forever and sending less than 1 bag of garbage to landfill for the entire Project. This is one of a number of "ZERO WASTE renovations" including a shower (reduced our water/energy consumption by 80%) and basement (used wood from a 100 year old local barn). More on our roof Project at http://goo.gl/V8inLR and on us in general at http://goo.gl/gq894E http://goo.gl/gWRfd and www.baleengroup.com  Would be happy to share what we have learned that living ZERO WASTE is possible, it saves tons of $$ and (inside secret) it is EASY!!! Look forward to hearing from you - love the show!
   The nuclear waste issue is a pretty big one for 27 minutes, particularly as one of your guests pointed out, because the general public knows little or nothing about it, (which may very well be just the way the nuclear industry would like it to be).   You may have tried to present a balanced picture of the issue, but I believe you ended up with a bunch of very interesting guests most of whom appear to be believers in the ultimate good of nuclear power.
I was also quite surprised that you didn't include Gordon Edwards, longtime spokesperson for the respected Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, and an internationally recognized authority on the safety of nuclear power.  If you ever do a Nuclear Waste, Part 2 program, Edwards would certainly help you achieve a more balanced perspective.
--Karl Raab
You ended your show on nuclear waste by implying that we have to choose between two evils: nuclear waste and carbon pollution.  This is not true.  According to many analysts we are on the brink of a revolution in clean and, crucially for our so called democracy, decentralized energy production and distribution, led by solar. Here is a link to an op-ed that appeared in The Guardian today:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/07/solar-has-won-even-if-coal-were-free-to-burn-power-stations-couldnt-compete

Here's Al Gore in the Rolling Stone:

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-turning-point-new-hope-for-the-climate-20140618

Tony Seba is also very persuasive on this:

http://tonyseba.com

I hope the CBC will get around to covering this fascinating development soon.

Thanks.  I'm enjoying the show by the way.
--Patrick Gregory
Torah!
Please pardon my informality, but I've got to share this with you. Oh heck, you probably know about this already, anyway:  what do you know about uh, what is it called..."Mealime"?
It's an online, subscription recipe - and GROCERY SHOPPING! - service. Yeah, so what? Those services are out there online. But this one is a meal planning service for ONE! Yes, all those recipes that make meals for 4 are just fine...unless you live alone. I have no experience with it, because I don't live alone. But we don't waste food either. I'm just horrified when I hear about food waste! If we do waste food, I am completely unaware of it. So there you go.
-- Katannya Dirkson, Vancouver







I've been in the 'waste diversion' business for over 20 years and recently worked on a textiles recycling project with existing collectors, brokers and resellers/raggers/recyclers.  We are buying twice as many textiles as we did 20 years ago and only diverting just around 20% of our textiles.  It is estimated millions of dollars of textiles are being landfilled in Nova Scotia alone!!!  Textiles are now the number 4 item in our landfills in the province.

As an fyi, Nova Scotia has the lowest disposal rate in Canada by far (based on Statistics Canada numbers).

Cheers,

Bob Kenne










As I always cook more than 2 of us can eat I invite people over for dinner.
 Many last minute, spontaneous dinner parties that are always fun.  Just need to have friends who don't plan their meals ahead of time and don't care if your place is messy. :-)
--Kathy Reducka

Emma Halenko,  a university of Waterloo student's award winning business idea in its early growth.  Breathtaking jewelry pieces. And get this,  she goes searching through bins and garbage for raw materials.  Well worth a look,  and possibly including in a segment on waste in fashion.
--Mario Pistone
How about this for "storage": take the glass (has to be glass) and shove it into a subduction zone. By the time its recycled in the earth's mantle it be harmless. Feasable? No idea, maybe your guests would know
--F Hinz


What an interesting show you have going.
As a water/waste water operator I attended  seminar a few years ago on the subject of the biofouling of wells, which is a prevalent problem in both the oil and water industries. The speaker told he was brought in as an adviser regarding the corrosion of the Titanic which turned out to be the affect of biological activity not the salty sea water. The presenter went on to illustrate many different strains of bacteria how effective they can be breaking down materials. The American Nuclear Authority called in this expert regarding the possible corrosion of the containers to be filled with nuclear waste and buried deep in very stable rock formations. The advisor told them the effective life of the containers would fall very short of the design life expectancy because of bacterial activity.

The American experts claimed that scenario was impossible as bacteria could not exist in such high radioactivity, off they went to Three mile Island abandoned nuclear power plant were the nuclear material had been submerged deep under water for a number of years , submersible cameras revealed strange looking growths some resembling stalagmites and they turned out to be huge colonies of bacteria completely at home in one of the most radioactive environments on earth. This is why, as mentioned on your program, for all kinds of reasons,  it would be better to reuse the spent material rather than just storing it. I cannot remember the name of the speaker at that seminar, but he has become a major corrosion expert and at the time was from the Saskatoon University.
I thought I would send you this item as a side note to that very interesting nuclear waste  program.
                    Thanks for the show, Regards, Barry Boyle
Dear Staff of 'What a Waste':
I listened last night with great interest to your show 'What a Waste' and want to inform you of the organization I volunteer with, Repair Cafe Toronto.

We are a community of Torontonians committed to helping anyone who walks through our doors with repairing, or attempting to repair, items they carry in--for free. The public are shown how to repair each item, so that they can learn the needed skill set for future repairs. 
Everyone is warmly welcomed and personally taken through the process from entering our doors, to signing up and being shown where to wait. While waiting, our participants are also shown where they can access healthy (also free) snacks.
The typical after-repair response is:
'They fixed my item. I am thrilled!'; or 
'Wow! More people should know about this!' or 
'OK. What's the catch?' (As there is no catch, the answer to this is really 'Pay it forward'); or 'This is absolutely amazing. Even though they were not able to fix my item, the advice they gave me was extremely helpful'.

"We believe that recycling is not the solution. 
When an object is not working, repairing it can bring it back to life."  

 
You can learn more about us at: 

www.repaircafetoronto.ca  
www.facebook.com/repaircafetoronto and 
on our 90 second video:

 I love your program keep it up.
--Marisol Sanabria
 Hi, I was just listening to your program and was thinking that we do reduce food waste with our mobile juicing unit. We take imperfect fruit and vegetables and turn them into juice. Right on the farm where the food is grown. We can juice anything from apples, to cherries, berries and even vegetables.
Might be something for your program.
--Remo Trovato
Hi there,
I am an interior designer in Toronto who has taken on the task of collecting and redistributing a LARGE portion of the virgin waste in my industry. I collect, sort and send hundreds and thousands of pounds of designer goods to the arts, education and non-profit communities.
As well, i have created a line of couture soft home goods from small amounts of the waste i collect with the goal of raising awareness of the monstrous amount of waste that is created in the field every season.
I usually refer to myself as the Robin Hood of fabric, but I really like Waste Warrior!
Here is link to my spring pillow collection: http://joom.ag/7YoX
Here is a link to my first art show:  http://joom.ag/MYQb
Zero virgin materials were used in my installation for the art project. Most items were taken off the street or out of construction waste bins.
--Eve Weinberg
I thoroughly enjoyed your program on CBC Radio One, Vancouver, today, Fri., 27 June, and hope it isn't just a summer fill-in. I will continue to listen, and hope that you will deal with the wastefulness of our 'disposable society', e.g. Swiffer mop-pads - use it once and chuck it instead of putting it in the wash; Kleenex wet-wipes - same scenario - instead of water and a washable towel; bottled water instead of a washable water bottle. I wish I could think of more examples, but I'm sure you get my gist.
--Su Everts
Just heard your program today so thought I'd check to see where the drop off is locally. The HHW in Peterborough accepts a lot of ewaste, but not smoke detectors. So what do you do with those? I have 2.
--Paulette DeLaBarre

CEMENT BOARD COMPOSTER Pictures on website  https://sites.google.com/site/indigenecommunity/design/5-cement-board-composters
Its three years since the Sustainable Development Association has created a prototype cement board composter.
 I am the director of a help center for pregnant women in Drummondville.  Over the past 25 years, I have had to discard over 150 car seats because they have passed the expirey date. The large majority of these seats are in very good condition and only about 30% have a triangle embossed on the plastic.  I feel terrible about putting these large items in the garbage.  So I take the time (my personal time, about 30 to 45 minutes per car seat) to separate the metal and the cloth from the plastic and to recycle as much as possible of the seat.  But it is VERY LABORIOUS!.  Some American cities and also Vancouver provide a program to recycle these items.  The car seats only last about 6 years and then the date is expired.  If 30% of the seats are made with recyclable pastic, then surely public pressure could encourage the other 70% of manufacturers to use recyclabe plastic also.  The consumer could be encouraged to only buy car seats with recyclabe pastic.  Your radio program could inform consumers on this issue.  Thank you!
--Joanne de Verteuil
Hi, I'm the designer of Shot Lister, a film shot list and scheduling app that does away with the mounds of coloured paper used on film sets - and I mean mounds! It's really changing the way filmmakers prep & film.

 I only first heard the words"ZERO WASTE Lifestyle" a few months back but I guess I have been living that way for years. Beginning as an informal household experiment in 2008 we have now reduced our waste out put to the point where we haven't put out any garbage to the curb since Aug 2011. We also just completed a ZERO WASTE Roof Project replacing our asphalt builder shingles with steel shingles that will last forever and sending less than 1 bag of garbage to landfill for the entire Project. This is one of a number of "ZERO WASTE renovations" including a shower (reduced our water/energy consumption by 80%) and basement (used wood from a 100 year old local barn). More on our roof Project at http://goo.gl/V8inLR and on us in general at http://goo.gl/gq894E http://goo.gl/gWRfd and www.baleengroup.com  Would be happy to share what we have learned that living ZERO WASTE is possible, it saves tons of $$ and (inside secret) it is EASY!!! Look forward to hearing from you - love the show!
   The nuclear waste issue is a pretty big one for 27 minutes, particularly as one of your guests pointed out, because the general public knows little or nothing about it, (which may very well be just the way the nuclear industry would like it to be).   You may have tried to present a balanced picture of the issue, but I believe you ended up with a bunch of very interesting guests most of whom appear to be believers in the ultimate good of nuclear power.
I was also quite surprised that you didn't include Gordon Edwards, longtime spokesperson for the respected Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, and an internationally recognized authority on the safety of nuclear power.  If you ever do a Nuclear Waste, Part 2 program, Edwards would certainly help you achieve a more balanced perspective.
--Karl Raab
You ended your show on nuclear waste by implying that we have to choose between two evils: nuclear waste and carbon pollution.  This is not true.  According to many analysts we are on the brink of a revolution in clean and, crucially for our so called democracy, decentralized energy production and distribution, led by solar. Here is a link to an op-ed that appeared in The Guardian today:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/07/solar-has-won-even-if-coal-were-free-to-burn-power-stations-couldnt-compete

Here's Al Gore in the Rolling Stone:

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-turning-point-new-hope-for-the-climate-20140618

Tony Seba is also very persuasive on this:

http://tonyseba.com

I hope the CBC will get around to covering this fascinating development soon.

Thanks.  I'm enjoying the show by the way.
--Patrick Gregory
Torah!
Please pardon my informality, but I've got to share this with you. Oh heck, you probably know about this already, anyway:  what do you know about uh, what is it called..."Mealime"?
It's an online, subscription recipe - and GROCERY SHOPPING! - service. Yeah, so what? Those services are out there online. But this one is a meal planning service for ONE! Yes, all those recipes that make meals for 4 are just fine...unless you live alone. I have no experience with it, because I don't live alone. But we don't waste food either. I'm just horrified when I hear about food waste! If we do waste food, I am completely unaware of it. So there you go.
-- Katannya Dirkson, Vancouver







I've been in the 'waste diversion' business for over 20 years and recently worked on a textiles recycling project with existing collectors, brokers and resellers/raggers/recyclers.  We are buying twice as many textiles as we did 20 years ago and only diverting just around 20% of our textiles.  It is estimated millions of dollars of textiles are being landfilled in Nova Scotia alone!!!  Textiles are now the number 4 item in our landfills in the province.

As an fyi, Nova Scotia has the lowest disposal rate in Canada by far (based on Statistics Canada numbers).

Cheers,

Bob Kenne










As I always cook more than 2 of us can eat I invite people over for dinner.
 Many last minute, spontaneous dinner parties that are always fun.  Just need to have friends who don't plan their meals ahead of time and don't care if your place is messy. :-)
--Kathy Reducka

Emma Halenko,  a university of Waterloo student's award winning business idea in its early growth.  Breathtaking jewelry pieces. And get this,  she goes searching through bins and garbage for raw materials.  Well worth a look,  and possibly including in a segment on waste in fashion.
--Mario Pistone
How about this for "storage": take the glass (has to be glass) and shove it into a subduction zone. By the time its recycled in the earth's mantle it be harmless. Feasable? No idea, maybe your guests would know
--F Hinz


What an interesting show you have going.
As a water/waste water operator I attended  seminar a few years ago on the subject of the biofouling of wells, which is a prevalent problem in both the oil and water industries. The speaker told he was brought in as an adviser regarding the corrosion of the Titanic which turned out to be the affect of biological activity not the salty sea water. The presenter went on to illustrate many different strains of bacteria how effective they can be breaking down materials. The American Nuclear Authority called in this expert regarding the possible corrosion of the containers to be filled with nuclear waste and buried deep in very stable rock formations. The advisor told them the effective life of the containers would fall very short of the design life expectancy because of bacterial activity.

The American experts claimed that scenario was impossible as bacteria could not exist in such high radioactivity, off they went to Three mile Island abandoned nuclear power plant were the nuclear material had been submerged deep under water for a number of years , submersible cameras revealed strange looking growths some resembling stalagmites and they turned out to be huge colonies of bacteria completely at home in one of the most radioactive environments on earth. This is why, as mentioned on your program, for all kinds of reasons,  it would be better to reuse the spent material rather than just storing it. I cannot remember the name of the speaker at that seminar, but he has become a major corrosion expert and at the time was from the Saskatoon University.
I thought I would send you this item as a side note to that very interesting nuclear waste  program.
                    Thanks for the show, Regards, Barry Boyle
Dear Staff of 'What a Waste':
I listened last night with great interest to your show 'What a Waste' and want to inform you of the organization I volunteer with, Repair Cafe Toronto.

We are a community of Torontonians committed to helping anyone who walks through our doors with repairing, or attempting to repair, items they carry in--for free. The public are shown how to repair each item, so that they can learn the needed skill set for future repairs. 
Everyone is warmly welcomed and personally taken through the process from entering our doors, to signing up and being shown where to wait. While waiting, our participants are also shown where they can access healthy (also free) snacks.
The typical after-repair response is:
'They fixed my item. I am thrilled!'; or 
'Wow! More people should know about this!' or 
'OK. What's the catch?' (As there is no catch, the answer to this is really 'Pay it forward'); or 'This is absolutely amazing. Even though they were not able to fix my item, the advice they gave me was extremely helpful'.

"We believe that recycling is not the solution. 
When an object is not working, repairing it can bring it back to life."  

 
You can learn more about us at: 

www.repaircafetoronto.ca  
www.facebook.com/repaircafetoronto and 
on our 90 second video:

 I love your program keep it up.
--Marisol Sanabria
 Hi, I was just listening to your program and was thinking that we do reduce food waste with our mobile juicing unit. We take imperfect fruit and vegetables and turn them into juice. Right on the farm where the food is grown. We can juice anything from apples, to cherries, berries and even vegetables.
Might be something for your program.
--Remo Trovato
Hi there,
I am an interior designer in Toronto who has taken on the task of collecting and redistributing a LARGE portion of the virgin waste in my industry. I collect, sort and send hundreds and thousands of pounds of designer goods to the arts, education and non-profit communities.
As well, i have created a line of couture soft home goods from small amounts of the waste i collect with the goal of raising awareness of the monstrous amount of waste that is created in the field every season.
I usually refer to myself as the Robin Hood of fabric, but I really like Waste Warrior!
Here is link to my spring pillow collection: http://joom.ag/7YoX
Here is a link to my first art show:  http://joom.ag/MYQb
Zero virgin materials were used in my installation for the art project. Most items were taken off the street or out of construction waste bins.
--Eve Weinberg
I thoroughly enjoyed your program on CBC Radio One, Vancouver, today, Fri., 27 June, and hope it isn't just a summer fill-in. I will continue to listen, and hope that you will deal with the wastefulness of our 'disposable society', e.g. Swiffer mop-pads - use it once and chuck it instead of putting it in the wash; Kleenex wet-wipes - same scenario - instead of water and a washable towel; bottled water instead of a washable water bottle. I wish I could think of more examples, but I'm sure you get my gist.
--Su Everts
Just heard your program today so thought I'd check to see where the drop off is locally. The HHW in Peterborough accepts a lot of ewaste, but not smoke detectors. So what do you do with those? I have 2.
--Paulette DeLaBarre

CEMENT BOARD COMPOSTER Pictures on website  https://sites.google.com/site/indigenecommunity/design/5-cement-board-composters
Its three years since the Sustainable Development Association has created a prototype cement board composter.
 I am the director of a help center for pregnant women in Drummondville.  Over the past 25 years, I have had to discard over 150 car seats because they have passed the expirey date. The large majority of these seats are in very good condition and only about 30% have a triangle embossed on the plastic.  I feel terrible about putting these large items in the garbage.  So I take the time (my personal time, about 30 to 45 minutes per car seat) to separate the metal and the cloth from the plastic and to recycle as much as possible of the seat.  But it is VERY LABORIOUS!.  Some American cities and also Vancouver provide a program to recycle these items.  The car seats only last about 6 years and then the date is expired.  If 30% of the seats are made with recyclable pastic, then surely public pressure could encourage the other 70% of manufacturers to use recyclabe plastic also.  The consumer could be encouraged to only buy car seats with recyclabe pastic.  Your radio program could inform consumers on this issue.  Thank you!
--Joanne de Verteuil
Hi, I'm the designer of Shot Lister, a film shot list and scheduling app that does away with the mounds of coloured paper used on film sets - and I mean mounds! It's really changing the way filmmakers prep & film.
Hello I am a warrior In 2001, the UN estimated that 40% of the drinking water in the world is squandered to flush toilets (the estimate for ON is 28%).  To us, this is like burning Louis XIV furniture in your woodstove, so since '01 we have recycled all the greywater from our washing machine and bathtub/shower for flushing.

 I only first heard the words"ZERO WASTE Lifestyle" a few months back but I guess I have been living that way for years. Beginning as an informal household experiment in 2008 we have now reduced our waste out put to the point where we haven't put out any garbage to the curb since Aug 2011. We also just completed a ZERO WASTE Roof Project replacing our asphalt builder shingles with steel shingles that will last forever and sending less than 1 bag of garbage to landfill for the entire Project. This is one of a number of "ZERO WASTE renovations" including a shower (reduced our water/energy consumption by 80%) and basement (used wood from a 100 year old local barn). More on our roof Project at http://goo.gl/V8inLR and on us in general at http://goo.gl/gq894E http://goo.gl/gWRfd and www.baleengroup.com  Would be happy to share what we have learned that living ZERO WASTE is possible, it saves tons of $$ and (inside secret) it is EASY!!! Look forward to hearing from you - love the show!
   The nuclear waste issue is a pretty big one for 27 minutes, particularly as one of your guests pointed out, because the general public knows little or nothing about it, (which may very well be just the way the nuclear industry would like it to be).   You may have tried to present a balanced picture of the issue, but I believe you ended up with a bunch of very interesting guests most of whom appear to be believers in the ultimate good of nuclear power.
I was also quite surprised that you didn't include Gordon Edwards, longtime spokesperson for the respected Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, and an internationally recognized authority on the safety of nuclear power.  If you ever do a Nuclear Waste, Part 2 program, Edwards would certainly help you achieve a more balanced perspective.
--Karl Raab
You ended your show on nuclear waste by implying that we have to choose between two evils: nuclear waste and carbon pollution.  This is not true.  According to many analysts we are on the brink of a revolution in clean and, crucially for our so called democracy, decentralized energy production and distribution, led by solar. Here is a link to an op-ed that appeared in The Guardian today:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/07/solar-has-won-even-if-coal-were-free-to-burn-power-stations-couldnt-compete

Here's Al Gore in the Rolling Stone:

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-turning-point-new-hope-for-the-climate-20140618

Tony Seba is also very persuasive on this:

http://tonyseba.com

I hope the CBC will get around to covering this fascinating development soon.

Thanks.  I'm enjoying the show by the way.
--Patrick Gregory
Torah!
Please pardon my informality, but I've got to share this with you. Oh heck, you probably know about this already, anyway:  what do you know about uh, what is it called..."Mealime"?
It's an online, subscription recipe - and GROCERY SHOPPING! - service. Yeah, so what? Those services are out there online. But this one is a meal planning service for ONE! Yes, all those recipes that make meals for 4 are just fine...unless you live alone. I have no experience with it, because I don't live alone. But we don't waste food either. I'm just horrified when I hear about food waste! If we do waste food, I am completely unaware of it. So there you go.
-- Katannya Dirkson, Vancouver







I've been in the 'waste diversion' business for over 20 years and recently worked on a textiles recycling project with existing collectors, brokers and resellers/raggers/recyclers.  We are buying twice as many textiles as we did 20 years ago and only diverting just around 20% of our textiles.  It is estimated millions of dollars of textiles are being landfilled in Nova Scotia alone!!!  Textiles are now the number 4 item in our landfills in the province.

As an fyi, Nova Scotia has the lowest disposal rate in Canada by far (based on Statistics Canada numbers).

Cheers,

Bob Kenne










As I always cook more than 2 of us can eat I invite people over for dinner.
 Many last minute, spontaneous dinner parties that are always fun.  Just need to have friends who don't plan their meals ahead of time and don't care if your place is messy. :-)
--Kathy Reducka

Emma Halenko,  a university of Waterloo student's award winning business idea in its early growth.  Breathtaking jewelry pieces. And get this,  she goes searching through bins and garbage for raw materials.  Well worth a look,  and possibly including in a segment on waste in fashion.
--Mario Pistone
How about this for "storage": take the glass (has to be glass) and shove it into a subduction zone. By the time its recycled in the earth's mantle it be harmless. Feasable? No idea, maybe your guests would know
--F Hinz


What an interesting show you have going.
As a water/waste water operator I attended  seminar a few years ago on the subject of the biofouling of wells, which is a prevalent problem in both the oil and water industries. The speaker told he was brought in as an adviser regarding the corrosion of the Titanic which turned out to be the affect of biological activity not the salty sea water. The presenter went on to illustrate many different strains of bacteria how effective they can be breaking down materials. The American Nuclear Authority called in this expert regarding the possible corrosion of the containers to be filled with nuclear waste and buried deep in very stable rock formations. The advisor told them the effective life of the containers would fall very short of the design life expectancy because of bacterial activity.

The American experts claimed that scenario was impossible as bacteria could not exist in such high radioactivity, off they went to Three mile Island abandoned nuclear power plant were the nuclear material had been submerged deep under water for a number of years , submersible cameras revealed strange looking growths some resembling stalagmites and they turned out to be huge colonies of bacteria completely at home in one of the most radioactive environments on earth. This is why, as mentioned on your program, for all kinds of reasons,  it would be better to reuse the spent material rather than just storing it. I cannot remember the name of the speaker at that seminar, but he has become a major corrosion expert and at the time was from the Saskatoon University.
I thought I would send you this item as a side note to that very interesting nuclear waste  program.
                    Thanks for the show, Regards, Barry Boyle
Dear Staff of 'What a Waste':
I listened last night with great interest to your show 'What a Waste' and want to inform you of the organization I volunteer with, Repair Cafe Toronto.

We are a community of Torontonians committed to helping anyone who walks through our doors with repairing, or attempting to repair, items they carry in--for free. The public are shown how to repair each item, so that they can learn the needed skill set for future repairs. 
Everyone is warmly welcomed and personally taken through the process from entering our doors, to signing up and being shown where to wait. While waiting, our participants are also shown where they can access healthy (also free) snacks.
The typical after-repair response is:
'They fixed my item. I am thrilled!'; or 
'Wow! More people should know about this!' or 
'OK. What's the catch?' (As there is no catch, the answer to this is really 'Pay it forward'); or 'This is absolutely amazing. Even though they were not able to fix my item, the advice they gave me was extremely helpful'.

"We believe that recycling is not the solution. 
When an object is not working, repairing it can bring it back to life."  

 
You can learn more about us at: 

www.repaircafetoronto.ca  
www.facebook.com/repaircafetoronto and 
on our 90 second video:

 I love your program keep it up.
--Marisol Sanabria
 Hi, I was just listening to your program and was thinking that we do reduce food waste with our mobile juicing unit. We take imperfect fruit and vegetables and turn them into juice. Right on the farm where the food is grown. We can juice anything from apples, to cherries, berries and even vegetables.
Might be something for your program.
--Remo Trovato
Hi there,
I am an interior designer in Toronto who has taken on the task of collecting and redistributing a LARGE portion of the virgin waste in my industry. I collect, sort and send hundreds and thousands of pounds of designer goods to the arts, education and non-profit communities.
As well, i have created a line of couture soft home goods from small amounts of the waste i collect with the goal of raising awareness of the monstrous amount of waste that is created in the field every season.
I usually refer to myself as the Robin Hood of fabric, but I really like Waste Warrior!
Here is link to my spring pillow collection: http://joom.ag/7YoX
Here is a link to my first art show:  http://joom.ag/MYQb
Zero virgin materials were used in my installation for the art project. Most items were taken off the street or out of construction waste bins.
--Eve Weinberg
I thoroughly enjoyed your program on CBC Radio One, Vancouver, today, Fri., 27 June, and hope it isn't just a summer fill-in. I will continue to listen, and hope that you will deal with the wastefulness of our 'disposable society', e.g. Swiffer mop-pads - use it once and chuck it instead of putting it in the wash; Kleenex wet-wipes - same scenario - instead of water and a washable towel; bottled water instead of a washable water bottle. I wish I could think of more examples, but I'm sure you get my gist.
--Su Everts
Just heard your program today so thought I'd check to see where the drop off is locally. The HHW in Peterborough accepts a lot of ewaste, but not smoke detectors. So what do you do with those? I have 2.
--Paulette DeLaBarre

CEMENT BOARD COMPOSTER Pictures on website  https://sites.google.com/site/indigenecommunity/design/5-cement-board-composters
Its three years since the Sustainable Development Association has created a prototype cement board composter.
 I am the director of a help center for pregnant women in Drummondville.  Over the past 25 years, I have had to discard over 150 car seats because they have passed the expirey date. The large majority of these seats are in very good condition and only about 30% have a triangle embossed on the plastic.  I feel terrible about putting these large items in the garbage.  So I take the time (my personal time, about 30 to 45 minutes per car seat) to separate the metal and the cloth from the plastic and to recycle as much as possible of the seat.  But it is VERY LABORIOUS!.  Some American cities and also Vancouver provide a program to recycle these items.  The car seats only last about 6 years and then the date is expired.  If 30% of the seats are made with recyclable pastic, then surely public pressure could encourage the other 70% of manufacturers to use recyclabe plastic also.  The consumer could be encouraged to only buy car seats with recyclabe pastic.  Your radio program could inform consumers on this issue.  Thank you!
--Joanne de Verteuil
Hi, I'm the designer of Shot Lister, a film shot list and scheduling app that does away with the mounds of coloured paper used on film sets - and I mean mounds! It's really changing the way filmmakers prep & film.













































A new inventioLove your show. I reuse empty plastic bottles, 500ml and 2l for packaging turbochargers at my business. They cushion a bit and are very strong.









Options

Font Size
Viewer Comments
Sounds
Translate posts and comments.
Powered by ScribbleLive Content Marketing Software Platform