How should we teach kids about the dangers of sexting?

Two parents in British Columbia have been charged with assault for hitting their 14-year-old daughter after she sent a nude image of herself to her boyfriend. What do you think is the proper way to teach kids about the dangers of sexting?

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  • Good morning/afternoon, welcome to the latest CBC Forum.
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  • Today we're talking about sexting amongst young people. How do we teach our kids about the dangers of the practice?
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  • A Canadian judge recently ruled that hitting your teen isn't the proper approach.

    Parents convicted of assault for 'spanking' teen daughter over nude Snapchat photo

    A religious couple in Salmon Arm, B.C., have been convicted of assault for "spanking" their daughter with a mini hockey stick and a skipping rope after learning she had sent nude photos of herself to her boyfriend on Snapchat.

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  • But the judge also wrote: "In this day and age, any reasonable parent would be concerned about a teenager sending nude pictures of him or herself via a cellphone or any other electronic device. The pitfalls and dangers of such activities are well-reported. Such behaviours can lead to bullying and even suicide."
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  • Which leads us to today's discussion: How should we teach kids about the dangers of sexting?
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  • in our home we have taken away the ipad also changed the password to internet. not sure it is enough though. certainly the removal of technology gets her attention tho
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  • First and foremost: Allow parents to discipline their children and do not allow the Gov't to interfere in this unless it's actual abuse.

    My parents used the belt and I'm still alive and well today.

    Besides, photos of this that are posted on the Internet typically remain there indefinitely, and the last thing that anyone needs is for these to somehow become public. That would be even worse than taking a few smacks to the bottom.

    Also this case reminds me of this: www.wthr.com
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  • From the article: "The pitfalls and dangers of such activities are well-reported. Such behaviours can lead to bullying and even suicide."
    Why haven't you said what the dangers ARE in your article? Do you not know?mettamuditaat 1:42 PM

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  • You take some time to figure out what the actual dangers of sexting are (as in, do some journalism), and then you tell people what you learned. You give them the information, with evidence. That's it.mettamuditaat 1:43 PM

    "Bullying and suicide" are not the dangers of sexting any more than they're the dangers of going to school and having social interactions. If "bullying and suicide" are reason not to sext, they're also reason to homeschool. To live in a box, actually.mettamuditaat 1:46 PM

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  • Hi, mettamudita. We've done lots of journalism on the topic:

    Sexting another back-to-school concern for parents, expert says

    It's back-to-school season and that's a good time for parents to start thinking about their kids and sexting, cyberbullying expert Brian Trainor says.

    Children and smart phones; how young is too young?

    How young is too young for a smartphone? 8, 9, 10 years old? Or do they have to be a teenager? As many parents struggle with this decision, data suggests the age at which children are getting their own cell phone is getting younger by the year.

    Sexting B.C. teen tells court: 'This is not who I am'

    A B.C. teenager who was found guilty of child pornography charges after "sexting" naked images of her boyfriend's former girlfriend has been handed a six-month conditional discharge.

    How to get some perspective before talking to teens about sexting

    Parents and principals are struggling with how to deal with sexting in an increasingly wired world. Experts say a focus on enforcement is detracting from a much-needed conversation about teenage privacy.

    Sexting: What the dangers are and how to manage them

    One in five high school students surveyed say they received a sext of someone that was forwarded to them by someone else, according to a new survey. And seeking porn online is on the rise.


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  • Even a 14-year-old? Older?
    The best way is to teach them about self respect. . . .and a good spanking!Deezat 1:47 PM

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  • Taking away things won't work.Children will find a way if they think the parents are wrong and old fashioned. The child has to understand the repercussions of what they are doing. If you've always been open and told them the truth it will be easier to warn them and have a frank discussion with them. If not explaining the seriousness of their actions in a loving manner is the best way to go.
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  • Easy, don't give them cell phones. A roll of quarters is all they need.
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  • If you've already "done lots of journalsm," why ask this question and hold this forum? Just give them the information, because if they're not listening to you, it means they don't believe you. Enough of your fauxtroversy.
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  • Best your kids. Seriously. Not abusively. Obviously. My parents taught me that way growing up. Old school European. With the hand or a belt. All my friends who never got beat growing up are irresponsible and lazy. I grew up to be a responsible individual, taught me that my actions have consequences. I see a lot of soft parents out there who let their kids get away with murder. Your not doing your kids any favors. If anything your screwing your kid up.
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  • Hi, TheTruth. In Canada, there's a problem with this approach. 

    From Jason Proctor's story about the Snapchat verdict, where the parents were convicted of assault.

    "As far as discipline is concerned, the Supreme Court has set out considerations whereby "corrective force" is deemed reasonable as opposed to assault: It must be intended for educative or corrective purposes, and the force has to be reasonable under the circumstances.

    The law generally accepts that those rules don't apply to corporal punishment used on children under two or teenagers."

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  • Discipline your children enough to navigate through the no-man's land of technology and the Internet. Teach them how it's different from real life and that you can endanger yourself by giving too much away. Finally, teach them self-restraint and to not do what they don't like or is dangerous.
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  • Maybe parents need to turn the tables and ask their children what they think the outcome would be if they, the parents were to have similar photos floating around out there in cyberspace. Have a conversation and let it sink in that someday they will have to face the same consequences.
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  • How do the Europeans deal with this trend/problem/whatever?
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  • A “Harry Potter” movie has cautions because of violence & sexual content. But children are exposed openly & with no warnings to reality shows, news, other movies & advertisements that are blatantly shallow & display lifestyles that are filled with people with just money & stuff, who have no feelings & do not display any responsibility nor respect towards just life & love, even with each other.
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  • In my opinion, there's no need to focus specifically on sexting. If you make an effort to teach your children about cause and effect, and consequences of action at a young age, they will naturally apply that knowledge to "sexting." It's kind of a no-brainer, really. Worst case scenario? They learn the hard way. It's not the life-ending event that people seem to make it out to be. What a strange world.
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  • Some kids would consider sex texting fun and games. Part of growing up. It is only an issue when everybody overreacts. It is a crime at 17 years and below and suddenly becomes in vogue at 18. .I am more concerned about the parents reaction, than any sex activity.Also the religious aspect complicates the matter with further nonsense.Much ado about nothing

    Durgan
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  • The whole message about respect yourself and respect others needs a major social media campaign to educate and impact these kids. Parental influence can be minimal on these issues and there is little chance the parent child relationship will be enhanced by taking phones or beating kids. Commercials depicting someone altering received photos or betraying friends by getting paid to share them is the only thing that kids can relate to if they haven't thought of the implications...and kids need to be part of the message design process.
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  • I was leaving but one more thing: Hitting kids isn't any more permissible than hitting adults. Kids aren't less human than adults, and if you hit them you should be legally charged. The only thing I learned from my parents beating me as a teen is that they're bad people. They are no longer in my life. If you want your kids to even speak to you as adults, think twice about assault and battery.
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  • There is a longer comment than many posts, but the topic deserves a thorough response.

    The research evidence, from government to non-profits, has shown time and time again that peer-to-peer support (so youth helping youth) with trustworthy and compassionate adults as mediators, is crucial to any long-term success with prevention programs.

    Punishment is different than accountability. Punishment's impact is to instill fear and often shame a person for a particular behaviour, often without trying to understand why the person did it. Punishment results in short-term compliance out of fear of repercussions. This is not long lasting and often a youth figures out a way to 'not get caught' or takes on other harmful behaviour, such as cutting oneself, missing school, isolating, or even running away from home. All of these can cause greater harm than the initial act.

    Accountability and empathy is giving a youth room to own up to their behaviour, discuss why they did it, create alternatives to the behaviour, and following up with them periodically to see how it's going. It's about support. For example, if they shared a picture to get sexual attention, to appear 'cool' - the discussion would be about finding alternative ways to feel accepted and wanted that do not cause them harm. Often it's a matter of exploring how to get a need met in a healthy way.

    Violence could also be involved and punishment tells the person it's their fault that they are targeted. A person could of been drugged and forced to take the photo. There could of been threats involved. It could be an adult asking for naked pictures, a person in a position of authority. Without asking, it's hard to get an accurate account of the situation.

    The youth is probably afraid enough, no need to make them more scared.
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  • Sexting, in a lot of ways, is symptomatic of a larger problem. The educational focus should be on teaching children and young adults self respect generally, rather than sexting specifically. There are a lot of reasons why teenagers in particular feel the need to commoditize their own body, not the least of which is incredible social pressure that sexy = valuable. This, of course, is a broad social problem and requires a broad social reaction. To focus solely on sexting is to miss the forest for the trees.
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  • The proper way to teach kids about anything is with intelligent informed guidance, and true respect for their person. If children have been raised with corporal punishment, a president is set. If the bar has been set at corporal punishment, it becomes the norm for that child. If a child has been treated with respect, and has been guided in nonviolent means of conflict resolution, it is rarely necessary to bash them about. Parents who resort to corporal punishment are really lashing out in frustration and anger, because they don't know how else to get their point across. By lashing out physically, children see their parents out of control and losing it. No wonder such children have little respect for their parents. The parents in this article went nuts on their kid. The sentence is appropriate.
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  • It is always best for parents to be honest and straight forward when dealing with their children. I can only speak from experience as a Mom of 2 sons.
    An example is when HIV/Aids became prevalent my sons were in their teens. I was terrified and so I not only talked to them about it but gave them articles to read so that they understood the importance of wearing a condom when having sex (which I didn't promote but heck, you can't always stop it).
    So perhaps parents should explain the consequences of sexting to their children in blunt straight forward facts.
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  • For thousands of years parents seemed to know how to raise their children. Its only in the last seventyfive years that the parents are getting stupid and the government, judges, professors, teachers are finding the proper methods to raise the young. How is it working for us??
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  • I remember a lime when linking two computers to one another consisted of putting suckers on your phone so I have been around the internet since its birth. I have always considered the Internet to be akin to a large virtual city with setts and plazas and parks and that you behaviour and what you post should be reflected by that concept. You would not go naked on your city streets and you would not engage in intimate conversations with total strangers. If you apply these sensible principles and teach them to your children it would go a long way in avoiding embarrassing and potentially dangerous behaviour. It's a simple enough concept that you and your children can grasp . Is my child old enough to be out on the street without my supervision ? Is my child behaving in a socially acceptable way ? Is my child trustworthy ? Polite ? Honest ? Once you have answered these question and have had " the conversation " with your kids trust them to do the right thing. Denying them access is a losing battle and thinking that you can control 100% of their online activity is futile. Good luck !
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  • I'll suggest that its a little too late for a spanking, if she's sending nude photos.
    Just say'in...
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  • So is the kid going to be charged with distributing child pornography?Chiliat 2:52 PM

    Here's an excerpt from the story below:

    "In Canada, a 2001 ruling by the Supreme Court established what's known as the intimate photo exception. 

    Writing for the majority, Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin stated that if the photo or video was taken by one of the people involved, and if it was consensual and kept private, then the image is not considered child pornography. 

    The images in question would show teenagers under 18 years old but over the age of consent, which ranges from 12 to 16, depending on their partner's age."

    The fine line between 'sexting' and child pornography

    Minors who text or post explicit photos of themselves or their friends can face child pornography charges — but legal experts are asking whether the Criminal Code and child pornography laws are the way to deal with this kind of behaviour.


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  • I have two tween girls. If I am telling teaching them something, I speak from a person to person perspective. I present facts, "play the tape through to the end", and explain possible ramifications of actions. Although they are not adults and I don't treat them as such, my kids are capable of understanding language and they appreciate me as a source of truth and guidance in their lives.

    Also very importantly, they don't fear me. They know they can come to me with issues and seek advice, as opposed to a lecture. There is give and take discussion that goes on. We walk through the problem. We discuss eventualities.

    An analogy that I guess I could use is ship building. I helped build the ship and maybe did a little programming of the navigation system but they are the ones piloting the boat. I hope I am giving them the ability to think critically and thoughtfully. In the end that is all I can do.

    And I sure as heck won't be beating them up if they don't walk in lockstep to "my rule".
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  • These parents are seriously out of touch. This is what kids do now, and probably would have done 1000 years ago too had cell phones been available. Discussions need to focus on the fact that once those pictures are out there, no matter how much you trust the person you sent them to, there is a very good chance they will be re-distrbuted publicly. And then we need to stop shaming women for wanting to share their bodies. I have a daughter, and I don't think her value as a person is determined by how many people have seen her naked.
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  • I got spanked as a kid. I knew what I did was wrong and I was punished for it. It was called consequences for my actions. I did not, never did, fear my parents. I respected them and still do.
    Big difference between spankings and beatings.
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  • Anyone that produces pornographic images of minors needs to be charged with distributing child pornography. Full stop. "Selfies" should definitely not be a defense!
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  • Parents are going to have a reasonable conversation with a teen that sends nude pictures of herself / himself over the internet?
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  • Tough question.

    I remember when I was 10, looking at playboys and Internet smut. It was fairly tame. Now that I have a son approaching 10, I think about the content that is easily and readily accessible on the Internet. A lot of it isn't just distasteful, it's downright disturbing and I don't want my kids exposed to that kind of content. But as a parent I can only shield them from so much. Society seems fine with woman selling their bodies for money, so long as it's documented and made as accessible to the general public as possible. Selling yourself privately is taboo though.

    I think our culture has become over sexulized, look how woman are almost always portrayed in media. Look how virgins and people who try to wait for the right person are shamed. Look how woman aspire to be as slutty as their male counterparts, as if that is something to apire to. I don't respect people who use others solely as a sexual conquest, to add another notch in the belt. Even marriage is deemed old fashioned. I believe trying to carve out a living with another person is a very human thing. While trying to hump as many people as you can makes you more akin to an animal.

    Is anyone really surprised that young woman and girls are peeling their clothes off to take nude photos of themselves?

    I think the solution lies in looking at our values as a society because I feel like Woman are being valued as sexual objects more and more by society and that has become the norm.

    Random though, by a guy
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  • If you see an argument you don't agree with, please respond to the argument rather than attacking the arguer. Had to reject a few of those just now.
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  • Lunch time. I'll be back in 30. The conversation is still open, so feel free to send your comments. I'll sort through them when I get back.
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  • Sexting is only a part of the equation - if you have open communication and teach your kids to be responsible and ethical and to stand up for what they believe in, then texting will not be a major issue
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  • These are the dangers of living in these last days. Also why I'm personally reluctant o have kids. Nearly impossible to shield them from the evil out there. Parents should not only tell their children what not to do, they must also clearly explain WHY. Should the government be involved in these types of issues though?
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  • I am East Indian, so don't get offended on my behalf, Miss White Moderator with buzz cut pink hair.

    If somebody blows up a plane full of Canadians, you give them a taxpayer funded hockey broadcast in their language. 25 years later and not a single criminal charge. Why? "Cultural Sensitivity"

    A child is disciplined by his her White Parents, and they are going to Prison? Why? Somewhere along the way, in the history of this country, the Straight White Male hung up his manhood, and the race has declined since.

    All I'm saying, if you are young white and male, it's not our beards you should be copying. It's a start, but stand up and take control of your family, and then your country, because I, the ethnic Man cannot stand up to this ultra liberal brainwashing, all by myself.
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  • Hi, Tom Archer. I'm a Mr. White Moderator with brown hair, but I thank you for your concern. ;)
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  • I can empathize with the parents but spanking likely wont change the child's behaviour and may make them resentful. Some children are willful and will not listen to their parents no matter what they do. They scoff at discipline such as grounding, sneaking out of the house and find ways to do what ever they want on line, there are computers and phones everywhere. Then they come to realize their parents were actually trying to protect them from harmful influences but it's too late in some cases. Our family has experienced years of drama with our daughter but in the end life lessons and the love of a good guy have saved her.
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  • welp, ive done stupid things with my nudes despite knowing all the risks and not being a teen, Ive stopped after i realized how stupid that was, so i dont think this is something that you could teach, as supposed to just giving them the knowledge about the dangers and letting them figure the rest out on their own
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  • The best way to deal with it--in my opinion--if to teach kids that NOTHING on the internet is private. That nude pic you send today may end up in their parents mailbox tomorrow.

    There is no 'delete'. Once you send that naked pic, that image will be out there for the rest of your life. You can't 'undo' that. At the very least, they should be taught never to have their face in an image, so even if things go bad, only they are the ones who know it was them.
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  • The Courts should be ashamed!! Many teenagers watch these cases quite closely actually, I know I did. Soon to be seen on the front page of LatchkeyKid.com. They already have the Young Offender's Act, eh? Let's not give too much ammo to the kids and undermine the Parent's Natural role as a Disciplinarian (especially the Father) In some cases, trying to rationalize with a Hormone crazy teen is nigh on impossible and could take days, weeks, or months, when a good swat on the bum fixes the problem, instantly. Good going Judge, you just set a precedent!

    --Comment written by a well adjusted, respectful, former child who received spankings for sometimes acting utterly foolish and endangering myself and my family's own well being. Nope, NOT traumatized, NOT entitled, and NOT weepy, fragile and unable to cope with life's setbacks.
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  • So someone needs to ask the judge what other options the parents could have given if he thinks he's so damn smart .Provide a guideline for others if you dare .
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  • The only way to 'teach' kids about sexting, or any other risky behaviour is to engage in ongoing, meaningful discussions. The question is, what should the consequence be if kids still cross the line? Corporal punishment is criminal and also ineffective, because it isn't connected to the offence. It erodes respect for parents and only escalates the problem. So how about taking away the cell phone, or refusing to pay the bills (presuming parents are still doing so for a 14 year old.) If the teen actually owns the phone and does pay the bills, I still think as a minor they should forfeit their phone if they use it to engage in obscene and dangerous behaviour. It's like forfeiting a driver's license for drinking and driving - zero tolerance with a G1. Parents should have this discussion and establish the ground rules before allowing teens to have a cell phone... so there are no surprises if consequences have to be employed. And incidentally, I'd apply this same discipline to the boys who make the requests, as well as the girls who supply the images.
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  • I agree with others; teach your kids that NOTHING on the internet is private, and that once it's out there, it can NEVER be completely "deleted". (I have sometimes showed my kids USENET posts I've made from 20+ years ago, showing that they're still out there.) And we've talked about when and where nakedness is appropriate, and how photographs and videos are almost never appropriate places to be naked. We've been very lucky with our children.
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  • All we can do is talk to our kids and try to teach them about the possible consequences. Then hope we did a good job in teaching our kids how to think for themselves and think about the consequences before they do something stupid. We did a lot of stupid things when we were growing up and most of us turned out OK. But nowadays, kids do stupid things that have far worse consequences. In the end, we can only hope we did a good job showing our kids how to make good choices because kids are going to do what they do regardless.
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  • I think we see this kind of inappropriate actions from parents because system and society put much responsibility on parents but other side of kids possess almost no responsibility.

    Sexting should be a crime and kids should be punish in some form. If parents and kids are aware of the penalty or penalty of sexting then parents and kids will behave in appropriate way.
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  • Does anyone think the sentencing of these parents is anything but punitive. I fail to be able to rationalize this conviction and I am a 35 year old male who has a 6 month old son. I do agree the skipping rope was over board. When you move from spanking to whipping the conversation changes, but a legal conviction and sentencing?
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  • Being a new dad, I am concerned with societies requirement of me to rationalize with a person who has learned to rationalize. From my experience children are not always rational. Yes we have to teach them how to think rationally but until that is learned I find myself stuck with faulty logic as I am asked to rationalize with an irrational being.
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  • I just don't see how this decision or really the whole charging, trial and so forth really helps either the family, the girl, or society generally. Isn't this something that could be handled with some mediation without it going through this mess and leaving two decent well meaning parents with criminal records and a teen with parents crippled with these? Also, did the police and prosecutors go ahead to charge and try the parents without the girl's consent? And, why is it acceptable to "ground" someone (forcible confinement)? Also, why do police get to use brutal corporal punishment like tazers, punching, smashing people off the ground, cuffing, and even shooting with bullets? How is incarceration not "corporal punishment"??? Locking someone up is a terribly cruel thing to do, much more than slapping their butt! Also, the judge believing that modern society is abhorred by such things as spanking is incorrect - that's just the opinion of the elite who bully their ways on the rest of society. Poll after poll has proven this as well as what we anecdotally know from coffee shop discussions and similar. This thing seems to have just gone WAY TOO FAR. The police and courts should look for compassionate and positive ways to help people, not to use a proverbial sledgehammer to overdo it.
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  • When you are about to hit your children, do it facing a mirror so you can see what a monster you have become. Then stop yourself and ask, "What the hell is wrong with me?"
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  • So to protect the girl, the "justice system" gives the parents a criminal record. The whole family unit, which includes the girl will now suffer financially.

    In addition, any mental and emotional scars suffered by the girl are magnified. Additional emotional scars have also been dealt to the rest of her family.

    Excellent work Canada "justice system". The logic here is impeccable.
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  • Part of the problem is people are putting a value on nudity. I don't suggest we do this, but if you think about it, if everyone put nude pictures of themselves on the internet for everyone else to see for free, then the value of nudity is 0. Because we teach kids to value it so much it becomes a weapon for others to use against us. however will protect my privacy as best I can and not take nude pictures of myself.
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  • There is no "proper way" too teach the dangers of such an action. It is the same difference from my era of kiss and tell but with a much larger audience. A good parent tells their child of these possibilities as they know it and, keeps an open dialogue with there children without judgement. The biggest thing parents must drill in to their children(s) head is that the digital world is vast and, unlike our world it cant just be deleted easily.
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  • Engage in meaningful conversation and make young people understand the meaning of what they do and the consequences of what happens when they do such a thing!
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  • Nudity is not considered bad in society we live in so how we can convince our kids sexting is bad thing?
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  • This is definitely a problem, but I do not think it is appropriate to spank a 14 year old girl, or any 14 year old for that matter.
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  • Stock photo.
    The person in the photo, whoever she is, easily identified by tattoo...Laurence Gough at 4:37 PM

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  • As important as it is to speak with young girls about this, it is equally and possibly even more important to speak with young boys.
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  • Here is the rub young ladies. Everything you do that can be recorded or snapped, can be used to hurt you and your aspirations. The digital age is merciless. My era were a kiss and tell that would be forgotten is long gone. The digital era is in fact almost ubiquitous. Choose wisely and if in doubt consult those that are older then you even if you might not like the statement.
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  • Grounding my child will not work as he never leaves his room. Since we are unable to discipline our kids, they can do what ever they want. New criminals on the rise.
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  • That they will go blind.....
    Actually, you cannot "monitor" a child 24/7. So the best recourse is to have a frank, explicit conversation with the kid and explain the consequences of doing ANYTHING on the internet.
    The repercussions are great and forever. If the child refuses to behave or listen, having examples of tragic outcome to others doing the same thing would be my next step. If nothing convinces the kid to stop, professional help (for all) would be appropriate. There could be many reasons for the behavior and looking in the mirror could be one!
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  • The judges point to this was not the fact that the father "disciplined her" hell he gave her a choice which, btw in my times there was no choice you took your lickings for your crimes. The problem was that the mother sallied forth adding even more punishment. That passes corporal punishment at this point and the father had an obligation to stop her,
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  • There should be a less draconian way of dealing with cases like this. Certainly if the girl ends up in provincial child care she has a good chance of much worse abuse and when that happens the principal of the school, the Judge, the prosecutor will not be there to pick up the pieces. Courts should be very very careful about breaking down families.
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  • Hi, Kenny Stevens. I'm not sure I understand what you mean. Care to elaborate?
    This live chat sure works well when you have to check up on every comment. Seems like a waste to meKenny Stevensat 5:02 PM

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  • Seems to me like a firm handling of ANY bad behavior is the way to put it to an end. No good behavior? No cell phone, that's what I say
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  • I don't use corporal punishment on my kids, BUT

    The daughter found corporal punishment less painful than extensive grounding. So the judge deems the lesser of two punishments to be worse than the greater, more severe punishment. That's not exactly illogical, but it is a bit hard to get my head around it
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  • I'm seriously wondering how TAKE AWAY PHONE was not an option in the discipline process. She's 14. Get her a flip phone for 2 months so she realizes phones for kids her age are not for textual intercourse! Having to use T9 texting again is discipline on its own :P
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  • If this punishment is a regular occurrence - then it's wrong and loses all meaning. But if prevents the child from exposing herself to a life time of pain and regret over her bad decisions - then it was wise. Sometimes how the child transforms his/herself into an adult is the only way to judge the merits of the punishment.
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  • Fifteen more minutes for this CBC Forum. If you've only been reading, now's your last chance.

    Lots of comments lately about the case itself, so let's re-ask the original question: What is the best way to teach kids about the dangers of sexting?
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  • Where as I do not agree with corporal punishment in any shape or form. I do not believe hitting your kid will change the habit but open and franc discussion would do a lot more good. Parents need to wake up and start talking to your kids about these things, sex, drugs, sexting, drinking and you need to do this BEFORE they become teens, not during teen years. Teens generally, if you have not opened the discussion before hand, will just ignore you. If this was my daughter I would have sat her down and explain why and what was wrong with what she did and then TAKE HER DATA AWAY
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  • Agreed. Education about this with your children starts long before they even get the phone etc. Doing your utmost to raise a confidant child, who doesn't feel the need for approval and (the wrong kind of) attention from someone else is the best thing you can do. And when all else fails, take the technology away until they know how to use it responsibly.
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  • That's all the time we have. Thanks for taking part. 
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